Two Awesome Hours

An international bestseller! Now available in 10 languages.

     
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Set Up the Right Conditions to Achieve Amazing Productivity

Rushing, multitasking, or relying on fancy devices and apps won’t help

Whether we love our jobs or not, the amount of work on our plate has reached unsustainable levels. We start each workday anxious about how we will get it all done, and which important tasks will have to be sacrificed—again—so we can keep our heads above water. We often respond to our out-of-control to-do lists by focusing on being more efficient—trying to get more done in less time.

According to Josh Davis, Ph.D., we’re going about it the wrong way. The answer is not to get more done faster, but rather to create the conditions for at least two awesome hours of peak productivity each day.

Neuroscience and psychology research is revealing what those conditions are.

Read & Explore the Book

Read an Excerpt

The Author

JOSH DAVIS, Ph.D., is Chief Scientist and Senior Faculty at the Mentora Institute.

As a writer, teacher, speaker, and coach, Josh studies and teaches about the mind and brain in multiple ways. His writing has appeared in Harvard Business Review, strategy+business, Training + Development, Psychology Today, and others. He also trains individuals in techniques derived from psychotherapy at the NLP Center of NY and coaches people to love public speaking.

Prior to joining Mentora, Josh guided the translation of research on behavior change into leadership content as the Director of Research and Lead Professor for the NeuroLeadership Institute, during a period where the organization more than quadrupled in size. He also served as a professor in the Department of Psychology at Barnard College, as well as Columbia University and New York University. He holds a bachelors in engineering from Brown University and a PhD from Columbia University, where he studied psychology and neuroscience. He has written for HBR, Fast Company, strategy + business, Psychology Today, and People & Strategy, among others.

Testimonials for Josh and The Art of Public Speaking

 

Endorsements

Heidi Grant Halvorson, Ph.D., Associate director of the Motivation Science Center at Columbia Business School and author of the national bestseller Nine Things Successful People Do Differently

“Most of the ‘personal productivity’ advice out there—and there is plenty of it—seems designed to make the hamster run a little faster in the wheel. Josh Davis‘s extraordinary new book, on the other hand, gives you evidence-based advice on how to leave the wheel behind, feel less stressed and more creative, and do the kind of work you are capable of. You are not a hamster. Two Awesome Hours will show you how to stop working like one.”

R. Michael Hendrix, Partner at IDEO

“Josh Davis shows us that trying to emulate a computer’s efficiency to manage our time is a lost cause. His approachable and enjoyable writing style brings behavioral science to life, pointing out the moments that really can make a difference in a productive workday, and equally important, a more satisfying downtime.”

Peter Bregman, bestselling author of 18 Minutes and Four Seconds

“Exceedingly interesting and exceptionally practical. Davis offers suggestions that are straightforward, easy to apply, and immediately useful. I spent two awesome hours reading this book last night and it changed the way I’m working today.”

David Rock, Director of the NeuroLeadership Institute and author of Your Brain at Work

“Josh Davis has proposed a counterintuitive solution to a problem plaguing us all: we can’t get everything done—not even close—anymore. So maybe we should stop trying and instead follow the research on how to have a few hours of breakthrough productivity, just on the things that truly matter. An important book, well researched, with lots of useful stories to bring the science alive.”

Selected blog posts and articles

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